Research Directions

Neurotechnological advances provide us with increasingly powerful devices to interface brain tissue and computational hardware for potential neuroprosthetic and neurorehabilitative applications in severely handicapped patients after stroke, spinal-cord injuries or neurodegenerative diseases.

In experimental settings, these brain-computer-interfaces (BCI) allow us to record and/or stimulate cortical circuits in order to control robotic arms or to restore motor function. Nonetheless, widespread clinical application is limited yet due to variable stability and performance of current BCI strategies in humans.

This research group strives to study real-time, closed-loop approaches of recording and stimulation in order to evaluate adaptive neuromodulation strategies with implanted BCI for neurorehabilitation of function and to translate this know-how into clinical use.

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News & Press
December 3 2015
Save the Date - CIN Dialogues 2015

The CIN Dialogues discussion series enters its next round. Hear K. Beyreuther, J. Brandstädter, and T. Rentsch on "Aging & Old Age" at the Audimax on Decemberg 3rd, 2015, 19:00h. Chair: W. Backes.


July 16 2015
BAW Announcement - METIS Program

The Board for the Advancement of Women (BAW) announces a new mentoring and training scheme for female researchers: "Success in academic career: How to become a professor?"

July 16 2015
Press Release: Tiny Eye Movements Highlight the World Around Us

 

Tübingen neuroscientists investigate the role of very small eye movements and their importance in controlling visual input into the brain


July 15 2015
CfA: Tübingen International Summer School 2015

Call for Applications: "Matters of Taste. The Neuroscience and Philosophy of Taste"
Tübingen International Summer School 2015 at Cloister Heiligkreuztal, September 20th - 23rd.

Deadline: July 15th!