Research Directions

Neurotechnological advances provide us with increasingly powerful devices to interface brain tissue and computational hardware for potential neuroprosthetic and neurorehabilitative applications in severely handicapped patients after stroke, spinal-cord injuries or neurodegenerative diseases.

In experimental settings, these brain-computer-interfaces (BCI) allow us to record and/or stimulate cortical circuits in order to control robotic arms or to restore motor function. Nonetheless, widespread clinical application is limited yet due to variable stability and performance of current BCI strategies in humans.

This research group strives to study real-time, closed-loop approaches of recording and stimulation in order to evaluate adaptive neuromodulation strategies with implanted BCI for neurorehabilitation of function and to translate this know-how into clinical use.

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News & Press
February 9 2015
New CIN Workshops

... in Philosophy and Neuroscience:
Games of the Brain


December 30 2014
Pointless Torture of Experimental Animals by Tübingen Neuroscientists?

Open letter by CIN chairman Peter Thier

December 13 2014
CIN Workshops: Games of the Brain Naturalizing Agency

Saturday, 13th December 2014 | 9.30am - 6.30pm | Hörsaal Forum Scientiarum (Doblerstr. 33, 72074 Tübingen)


December 8 2014
New Publication in Nature Neuroscience

The retina changes its „language“ with changing brightness

A study at the University of Tübingen highlights the intricate nature
of visual responses - findings may help to improve digital cameras
as well as visual prosthetics